Saturday, March 6, 2021

Unorthodox Unorthodox

Over the years I've met some unusual and impressive people, but our guest this past Shabbos really took the cake. She's a medical student who, in scrubs and jeans, looks no different than any other medical student. But Nisi Goldstein is the only female medical student in the history of the world to have grown up in Satmar.

Most people's image of girls who break away from Satmar comes from the immensely popular Netflix series Unorthodox. And yet Nisi's story could not be more different. There's a very orthodox view of what unorthodox means, and it's not Nisi.

The seventh child of thirteen (now that's what I call a "middle child"), Nisi grew up in Williamsburg, which was a different world. She didn't speak English until she was taught it in school. The biggest cultural transition in her life was from Satmar to Beis Yaakov in Israel - bigger than her subsequent transition from Beis Yaakov student to medical student! When she tells people in Satmar that she is studying to become a doctor, they assume that she is misspeaking and means nurse; they are not accustomed to the idea that women can become doctors.

What caused her to break away? Nisi told us that the very first thing which shook her, as a young girl, was when Satmar had its Great War between the Rebbe's sons, Aharon and Zalman, over who should succeed the Rebbe. All of a sudden, everything broke in two - her community and even her school. All of a sudden she wasn't allowed to socialize with half of her friends. This made her realize that something wasn't right.

As she grew up, she was curious about the world beyond the extremely narrow confines of Satmar. Watching any videos in Satmar was, for the most part, banned while she was growing up. For special school events, there were slideshows of photos accompanied by narration. She loved these (and says that they displayed great artistic creativity), but she wanted more. Surreptitiously, she was able to watch DVDs of musical performances by frum (but non-Satmar) women. Nisi was thrilled when, over Shabbos, we were visited by our friend and neighbor Dr. Kerry Bar-Cohn, who, under the stage name "Rebbetzin Tap," has produced amazing musical videos. We were laughing about how notwithstanding how far Nisi has come since then, she was star-struck to see her childhood superstar! Kerry herself served as a role-model for Nisi in showing that "you can be anything."

As she progressed through high school, Nisi was clearly not fitting in to the Satmar mold. Here's the point at which you'd expect to hear that everyone was attempting to force her to accept that she has to toe the line and live her life in full obedience to the Satmar way. But that is not what happened. To be sure, she had her stresses and difficulties with people in that community. But they encouraged her to try a new path and go to Beis Yaakov in Israel. I know that Beis Yaakov sounds extremely frum to many of us, but coming from Satmar, as I mentioned earlier, it was an absolutely radical move. Satmar views Beis Yaakov as being a severely inferior form of Judaism, so it was incredible that they supported her transition.

Here's something else intriguing. While Satmar looks down on all other branches of Orthodoxy, Satmar itself is very different from Litvishe Orthodoxy in that the men do not go to kollel. They all work, while their wives raise the children, in a much more traditional lifestyle. At one point, when Nisi was in a rebellious stage in Beis Yaakov, she threatened her parents that she wanted to marry a guy in kollel!

Eventually Nisi ended up training as a social worker at Wurzweiler in New York. But as she was completing her studies, her interest was suddenly triggered in the biological sciences - which she had never learned about in Satmar. (Ironic aside - although I'm the director of a natural history museum and I have a PhD, I too have never in my life taken a formal class in biology, since the grammar school that I attended in Manchester was too frum to teach it.) And so she enrolled in medical school, taking classes in Israel, but she will be returning to the US for residency. She would like to serve in the chassidic community in New York and implement positive change in this way. At the moment, aside from her medical studies, she is a madricha at a home for girls at risk.

Unlike what you might expect, Nisi does not hate Satmar. She is very critical of the leadership and many aspects of the lifestyle, but she maintains that the people there in general are just as nice as everyone else, and the community engages in tremendous chesed. She has a positive relationship with her family - her mother is immensely proud of her becoming a doctor - and she goes back regularly to visit.

Over the years, Nisi drifted a long way from her roots, and she traveled extensively around the world. But she says that in the various exotic locations that she visited, Chabad houses were incredible. They made her realize that she does want to be Jewishly connected. She is not yet sure what form she wants that to take, but she is young and still figuring things out. Meanwhile, she sent me the following lovely text after Shabbos:

Thank you so much for having me. It truly was a wonderful Shabbat. It inspired me to see if I can go to more Jewish families in the future to experience healthy Judaism. 

When I sent her this post for her approval, she also asked me to tone down parts that were too critical of Satmar!

Meanwhile, Nisi has a GoFundMe page to help support her through medical school. Helping create a doctor - and not just any doctor, but the world's first Satmar-raised female doctor - is an excellent way to invest in making a difference to the world. You can support Nisi's education at this link.

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68 comments:

  1. Has she left the fold. or do you think that is irrelevant?

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    1. The title 'Unorthodox Unorthodox' has answered that question.
      It would be interesting to know why: was it the scientific method? the age of the world? the evolution? what was it?

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    2. Education is great although this post is silent on the religion aspect. Judging by the tzniyut displayed in the picture, it does seem a bit unfortunate.

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    3. Yakov, "why...?"

      The article provides some reasons. But you are surely aware that the common reasons, certainly for a young Satmar Chassidita, have nothing to do with science. And it's certainly a minority among other reasons which involve pain and disillusionment.

      As regards observance of Maaseh Halacha (Chovos Ha-Eivarim) RNS's books have only promoted that. Many have testified to that effect, & RNS certainly observes Maaseh Halacha. Even his detractors admit to that. (I was in contact with an individual who is very grateful to RNS's books for helping his son remain frum despite Torah-science conflict.)

      The (alleged!) question is only about legitimate Hashkafa (Chovos Ha-Levavos). OTD people have left observance and do not fit into any of these categories.

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    4. Tzniyut? What are you talking about?

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    5. @Chaim

      Yes, I'm well aware of their reasons and I've known plenty, but, as a student of life, I'm interested in the reasons of the thinking, quality people. At the end of the day it's a genetic selection that is taking place.

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    6. @Yakov, "...as a student of life, I'm interested in the reasons of the thinking, quality people. At the end of the day it's a genetic selection that is taking place."

      Sounds like a good comment, but can you be more clear? Ty.

      Delete
  2. Interesting story. Thank you for sharing.

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  3. The school you attended in Manchester was banned from teaching biology following a furore sparked by Manchester's very own Rebbe, who lived on the other side of Waterpark Road from the Menahel's house.

    As is the custom, appeals to the religious hierarchy in Israel were made. The Steipler intervened on the side of ignorance, and you can read his supportive letter in Kerina D'igrosa.

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    1. I don't know at what time period this furore took place, but I definitely studied and passed my biology GCSE in the school. It was taught by Mr Hellins...

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    2. Hi Benji,

      To remind you (I believe this was relevant to you 23 years ago) you took a combined science GCSE, not a separate biology one, with pages from textbooks showing sexual reproduction removed. The 'A' stream would have only been taught chemistry and physics as single sciences. Biology was, I think, an option at A level. The Welshman you mentioned, with the signature penchant for pulling hair as a form of corporal punishment, did not teach for roughly between the period (early 80s?) That canning was banned and the late 1990s, The furore was well before your time and mine (though it provided context for the subsequent second war of Waterpark road concerning a speaker the Horodonker disapproved of, dustbin lid banging by Chassidim, and at least one MJGS student being punched in the face etc., that you must surely remember, as you grew up a 4 minute walk from the battlefield.)

      I learned about this context only retrospectively. When I was in yeshiva when someone showed me the letter of the Steipler to the Horodonker about 'a certain school in Manchester' where they teach boys 'pritzus and immorality' which was 'certainly forbidden'. It's a rare Sefer and not available on Hebrew Books which is a shame as it is a fascinating story.

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    3. What did I eat for breakfast this morning?? 馃ぃ馃ぃ

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    4. Brackman's bagels, I'm thinking. For who is really on the spiritual level to face down a bowl of cholent on a Monday morning?

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  4. How do you know she's "the first one in the history of the world?" Of course, it's an unusual path, but out of the many thousands of satmar, how do you know there haven't been some before her?

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    1. Certainly after the war a lot of Satmar left the fold, dropping religion or (worse) becoming Religious Zionists. R' Rakeffet tells the story of a high-ranking Israeli cop, secular, whose father had been a prominent Satmar Chasid and who came to see the Rebbe (Yoelish) when he came to visit Israel. The Rebbe said, "I remembered your father. How did this happen to you?" and the cop said, "Had we listened to you before the war, we wouldn't be alive today." The Rebbe acknowledged that a lot of teshuva had to be done, although it doesn't seem any public admissions or changes were made.

      But I think he means a woman who was literally raised Satmar, which she is likely the first.

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    2. What did he mean when he said "had we listened to you before the war, we wouldn't be alive today"? Did he imply that R Yoel told everyone to stay in Europe?

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    3. Didn't a grandson of one of the brother's finish Tzahal?

      2. I used to take my father to an ENT in Nachum's old neighborhood, whose claim to fame was being the Satmar Rebbe's ENT (and for keeping patients, including small children and their young mothers waiting way past midnight. Not that he was a top notch specialist, he was OK). And a YC and AECOM grad.

      Delete
  5. "When she tells people in Satmar that she is studying to become a doctor, they assume that she is misspeaking and means nurse; they are not accustomed to the idea that women can become doctors."

    Yeah I dunno about that... The ones in Brooklyn go to hospitals like NYU and others, and the laboring women always asked if I could find a female doctor to do their epidural, so clearly female doctors are not an unfamiliar concept? They don't ACTUALLY live in the 19th century.

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    1. It's true in Brooklyn and in the USA in general the chasidim are used to seeing female doctors, however I'm surprised that you seem to have experience with knowing chasidish women who preferred a female to start their epidural? My wife used to work in williamsburg with alot of Satmar women & my wife who had used a female ob/gyn asked these satmar women why they wouldn't try my wife's doctor. It was weird, they looked down on my wife's recommendation. They thought it better to have a male ob/gyn, they couldn't accept the concept that a female ob/gyn could possibly be any good!

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    2. Why just epidural, and not exams and other treatments?

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  6. Usually I'm very critical of your anti-chareidi activism. However, I must commend you on this form of positive activism. Keep it up and may you continue on this path!

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  7. I never watched that show Unorthodox. What is it even about? Why is it so popular? I don't get it? You keep hearing about it. Why?

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    1. What is interesting is WHY people leave religion or come to it. A short excerpt of about 10 minutes that I'd watched lacked the depth. It was typical boring OTD whining: I wasn't taught english, math, science, I never kissed a boy in my life, I never held a girls hand, I just went to McDonald on Shabbos and ate a ham sandwich and it felt so good. I'm not kidding, these are the real examples. It's a parade of human trash. Now, I'm not saying that secular people dont have morals or values or depth. Many do, but the OTDs featured in the excerpt I watched just didn't have it.

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  8. A little hyperbolic

    1. Where is your stat to back up that no one from satmar went to med school [especially if include those, like her , that left the 'fold' ]

    2. There are plenty of Satmar in Kollel

    3. She should connect with Allison Joseph's of Jew in the City and especially her Project Makom which assists individuals like her.

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    1. Certainly a lot of Satmar work. But poverty is very high, and not just because they don't have an education or because of scams. A lot of Satmar don't work, I think more in Kiryas Joel than in Williamsburg.

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    2. The Satmars work, but their living salary is based on getting food stamps and Medicaid.
      Frankly, their job skills aren't worth much more.
      The more skilled ones do move ahead, but not to taking academic education.
      And since the women have or will have child rearing responsibilities soon, the salaries reflect that

      Delete
  9. You might be interested in Akiva Weingarten who grew up within the Satmar community and now (amongst other things) is the rabbi to the Basel (Switzerland) Liberal community and the Dresden (Germany) Liberal community and describes as a "liberal Hasid." See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akiva_Weingarten

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    1. “My general approach to Judaism is that everything that is in Judaism belongs to us, the people,” he explained. “We will determine which parts we want to keep and which parts we don’t.”

      Not very interesting, just standard kfirah.

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  10. A disappointing article and not up to your usual standards. Unconfirmed claims about her being the only raised satmer med student as well as some overly broad generalities as to Satmer vs Livish life which are not quite accurate.
    You could have written an interesting and informative article without all that attempt at sensationalizing the story.

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  11. I had the same question. Naturally her standard of religious practice will never be one that would be condoned by the Satmar community, but my decision to contribute to Nisi's training would be much easier if I knew that she was striving to be shomeres Torah umitzvos at the same time.

    Training is medicine is certainly not incompatible with Orthodox Jewish life, provided one has access to a good source of halachic advice.

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    1. Nah, if you're going to give, give unconditionally

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    2. Yaakov, what difference does it make? You're a doctor, you surely understand the value of the profession. And this young woman had to overcome overwhelming challenges to get to this point.

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    3. The difference it makes, Rabbi Slifkin, is that we would feel more inclined to give if she hasn't rejected the Torah lifestyle we work so hard to promote, encourage and strengthen, the lifestyle we yearn to see our children maintain and pass on. If she has rejected that, well then, she's just another medical student who doesn't represent our values. Why support that? If she has maintained her commitment to Torah throughout her travails, then she represents our values while overcoming tremendous adversity, and deserves our support and encouragement.

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    4. But it's precisely the SHORTCOMINGS in certain "Torah" communities which made it so much challenging for someone like Nisi to go to medical school. If you feel that you're part of the same larger community as Satmar, then you also need to share responsibility for the problems that they cause and not just support spreading the lifestyle.

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    5. No, don't support her as an apology for "the damage our communities cause", or some such nonsense. Rather, support her because she is a poor girl, obviously had problems, comes from a frum family, and will probably return if people treat her with kindness. You should support her in her current endeavour the same you would support her if she was going to rehab.

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  12. Since when is 'becoming a doctor' on the expense of ones extend of adherence to Judaism such a great thing?

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    1. It's not a new phenomenon.
      讗ֲ诪ַ专ְ转ֶּ诐 砖ָׁ讜ְ讗 注ֲ讘ֹ讚 讗ֱ诇ֹ讛ִ讬诐 讜ּ诪ַ讛 讘ֶּ爪ַ注 讻ִּ讬 砖ָׁ诪ַ专ְ谞讜ּ 诪ִ砖ְׁ诪ַ专ְ转ּ讜ֹ 讜ְ讻ִ讬 讛ָ诇ַ讻ְ谞讜ּ 拽ְ讚ֹ专ַ谞ִּ讬转 诪ִ驻ְּ谞ֵ讬 讬ְ讛讜ָ讛 爪ְ讘ָ讗讜ֹ转.
      讜ְ注ַ转ָּ讛 讗ֲ谞ַ讞ְ谞讜ּ 诪ְ讗ַ砖ְּׁ专ִ讬诐 讝ֵ讚ִ讬诐 讙ַּ诐 谞ִ讘ְ谞讜ּ 注ֹ砖ֵׂ讬 专ִ砖ְׁ注ָ讛 讙ַּ诐 讘ָּ讞ֲ谞讜ּ 讗ֱ诇ֹ讛ִ讬诐 讜ַ讬ִּ诪ָּ诇ֵ讟讜ּ.

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    2. It's not "at the expense of adherence to Judaism." It's completely unrelated.

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    3. I don't get it. When kollel people come collecting at your door do you not feel less inclined to donate than if it were a hesder boy in need?

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    4. Of course. Because I think it's wrong to be in kollel.

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    5. So why is it hard for you to accept that some people think it's wrong to abandon a torah lifestyle?

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    6. People asking if she is still torah observant are not hesitant to donate because he's is becoming a doctor, but because she has abandoned observance.

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  13. You have got to be kiddingMarch 7, 2021 at 9:51 PM

    A GoFundMe page?!? Seriously? What happened to the regular student loans we normal people all took out and eventually had to pay back out of our salaries/income? She needs tzedaka to go to med school? Wow. Crazy generation.

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    1. Girl gotta eat. Also living in cardboard box gets chilly in the winter.

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    2. Well, I think it's fine to ask for help, if you need one. Many can identify with that. What isn't fine is to title your appeal as 'Help a Satmar-Hassidic student become a doctor' when you are neither Satmar nor Hassidic anymore. This is misleading. I, in my own little way, would happily chip in for an observant Satmar Hassid of either gender to become a doctor, but this is simply not the case here. This is bizzare.

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    3. Why would you happily chip in in that case, then?

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    4. @Nachum

      讻讬 讗讞讬谞讜 讘砖专讬谞讜 讛讜讗. 讗讞讬谞讜 讘诪爪讜讜转.

      I understand the rejection and temptations that he would be facing and would try to make it easier. Charity. The proverbial teaching a man to fish. I support Kollel learning also. All the debate aside, those were the best years of my life and I gladly help others to benefit when it's their turn. But I do not support OTD, they have their own organizations to help them, which is good and proper. I wish them the best, but it's just not my thing. Whether Nisi remains a social worker or becomes a doctor doesn't concern me.

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    5. Whether Nisi remains a social worker or becomes a doctor doesn't concern me.... Yakov

      That is Yakov until she becomes the world expert in a pathology you have and saves your life.. you might not want a share in her Mitzvah of helping others in a lifetime of practicing Medicine. To me she is a far better ticket to olam Habah than supporting kollels...

      Delete
  14. My son in law attended the same medical school as Zisi but did not rely on tzedaka or a Go Fund Me campaign. He relied in school loans (250k!) which take over a decade to pay back. There are loan forgiveness programs in which doctors can work in impoverished communities or rural communities with low physician populations (think indentured servant) for a period of six years. It's a very long road but absolutely doable. And of course there are wealthy parents out there who pay their kids tuition, no different than the parents who pay for their kids kollel lifestyle. Unfortunately for my son in law neither set of parents footed his tuition bills. And -- he survived.

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    1. Very bureaucratic and often other problems with these loan forgiveness and impoverished neighborhoods problems.
      Some people served and find out give years later they don't qualify, even after getting an official government referral.

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  15. "Helping create a doctor - and not just any doctor, but the world's first Satmar-raised female doctor - is an excellent way to invest in making a difference to the world. You can support Nisi's education at this link".

    Compare to:

    "He was a very nice man, very respectable, a rebbe in a Talmud Torah, collecting for four of his thirteen children, who recently got married etc etc. As he turned to leave, I offered him a small amount of money. He said that he didn't want to take it unless I felt that it was a great zechus for me to be able to support his children in kollel. I replied that I didn't consider it a zechus at all. So he refused to take the money, wished me well and left" - Nosson Slifkin January 2021

    Now compare:

    诪爪讜转 注砖讛 诇讬转谉 爪讚拽讛 诇注谞讬讬诐 讻驻讬 诪讛 砖专讗讜讬 诇注谞讬, 讗诐 讛讬转讛 讬讚 讛谞讜转谉 诪砖讙转, 砖谞讗诪专 驻转讜讞 转驻转讞 讗转 讬讚讱 诇讜 讜谞讗诪专 讜讛讞讝拽转 讘讜 讙专 讜转讜砖讘 讜讞讬 注诪讱 讜谞讗诪专 讜讞讬 讗讞讬讱 注诪讱 讜讻讜' 诇驻讬 诪讛 砖讞住专 讛注谞讬 讗转讛 诪爪讜讜讛 诇讬转谉 诇讜, 讗诐 讗讬谉 诇讜 讻住讜转 诪讻住讬诐 讗讜转讜, 讗诐 讗讬谉 诇讜 讻诇讬 讘讬转 拽讜谞讬谉 诇讜, 讗诐 讗讬谉 诇讜 讗砖讛 诪砖讬讗讬谉 讗讜转讜, 讜讻讜' 注谞讬 砖讗讬谞讜 专讜爪讛 诇讬拽讞 爪讚拽讛 诪注专讬诪讬谉 注诇讬讜 讜谞讜转谞讬谉 诇讜 诇砖诐 诪转谞讛 讗讜 诇砖诐 讛诇讜讗讛, 讜注砖讬专 讛诪专注讬讘 讗转 注爪诪讜 讜注讬谞讜 爪专讛 讘诪诪讜谞讜 砖诇讗 讬讗讻诇 诪诪谞讜 讜诇讗 讬砖转讛 讗讬谉 诪砖讙讬讞讬谉 讘讜. - Rambam Hil MatnasAnyiim

    Compare to:

    ....?????????........ - that's right, believe it or not I could not find anywhere the Mitzvah to help someone pay for medical school. (Helping someone find a job means just that, not paying for their university education).

    Sometimes you're posts make me think you'd be better off calling them just "Rational" not "Rational Judaism".

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    1. This is not s proper comparison. Financial support for kollel is a questionable practice. At least in RNS's understanding of Judaism. One can delete this point, yet it is most definitely a mainstream view in Judaic sources. Yet helping someone support themselves, is the greatest form of charity. This is not open for debate.

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    2. No one said support a person to enable him to learn. The argument I made was that someone who learned in Kollel and now needs money desperately to marry of a kid, is a plain old classical worthy Tzedokoh cause - despite him having made an incorrect decision over not going to work to begin with. All the more so when as an individual his social upbringing probably never afforded him a real opportunity to actually make the decision to go find a job.

      On the other hand although helping someone find a job is the greatest Tzedakah, I doubt paying for an education is also included.

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    3. The problem is that this person didn't see himself as having made a bad decision. And he was encouraging his kids to make the same bad decision.

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    4. @Ruvi, "although helping someone find a job is the greatest Tzedakah, I doubt paying for an education is also included."

      It's your feeling against mine. I'd think that it is included.

      If I find a source either way I'll let you know.

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    5. Acc. to R Melamed, university tuition is included in 爪讚拽讛 even for parents for their older children, similar to finding them a job.
      https://www.yeshiva.org.il/midrash/7238
      search word "讗讜谞讬讘专住讬讟讛"

      Delete
  16. What I think people find offensive here is the notion that you can be whatever you want to be.

    You can't. Some doors close on you as you take on carrying responsibilities. Some doors never opened in the first place. The rule is that for most people born into poverty, that will be your lot in life all the days you labor under the sun.

    If you don't have the gumption, charisma, the compelling story to tell, if you follow the path laid out to tie you down, if you don't have the support of rich family to attend the elite institutions of education that the rich use to create barriers to entry - then you will be serving the wealth of the wealthy for the length of your days and getting poorer and sicker so they can be wealthier. You will get up at the crack of dawn to supervise in their fine eateries so that they are not denied the smallest pleasure. You will manage the properties or the rich and collect their rent, but you will never participate in the above inflationary rises in house prices, or access the leverage they use to participate further. You will be married with young children before you work out how the world works; and after then it will be too late. You will be raising your children to serve as you did. You will always earn your bread from the sweat of your brow, not from your 401(k) or your NHS 2015 Scheme Growth with SPE2 elections made.

    What makes it more egregious is that you will encounter the Modern Orthodox princelings, defined as much by their family money and social class as by any hashkafic perspective. They regard their privilege as quantification of their moral worth and blog about your poverty as a moral failure to contribute. These ten percenters will angrily resent your characterisation as such because their eyes are fixed on the even richer.

    It is a consequence of the natural inclination of the wealthy to keep their progeny one step ahead, the law of evolution. The rich get richer and the poor get poorer.

    Good luck Ms Goldstein. You will need it.

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    1. The hat sounds like a socialist. Plenty of people rose from poverty to millionaire


      https://www.businessinsider.com/millionaires-billionaires-who-came-from-nothing-rags-to-riches-stories-2019-7?r=US&IR=T#ed-sheeran-dropped-out-of-school-and-slept-in-subway-stations-4

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    2. The reason is that the poor generally have lower IQ then the rich. Their children inherit it. Same applies to human races. Look at Brazil, for example, the Japanese, the Germans, the Jews and the Europeans are at the top because of the quality of their character, not the color of their skin.

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    3. Plenty of people?

      How many EXACTLY?

      Oh, and how many made money in the boom post war years, were business and financial regulation was lax? One gevir in Golders Green made his millions through thousands who lost their life savings on his failed schemes. It was all quite legal at the time, regulation of these financial type things in the fifties and sixties was virtually non existant.

      There are others.

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    4. Sammy, I'm not an any -ist. I'm against (in a pragmatic, factual and non-ideological way) fortresses of state or private individual power which build up in a way so as to entrench inequality.

      I'm sorry to have hijacked this thread, which is about one individual's attempt at escape against the odds from poverty, with my irrelevant musings.

      Of course Charedi ideology is very much responsible for part of the poverty; but lets not neglect their poverty. They are not of the same socio-economic standard as PhDs, lawyers, accountants, and doctors. They make do with less.

      The rate of change of wealth for the past 50 years has increased with increased wealth, leading to divergent outcomes.

      Whether we will diverge into separate species Yakov, I doubt: and if IQ is negatively correlated to family size it is likely to be an evolutionary dead end. The explanation is rather less hifalutin - of course every parent wants to give their kids the best chance in life (because of evolution), and rich parents with less kids can impart a bigger push.

      However, we certainly need better societal rules and norms. The current situation has strained the patience of the poor beyond breaking point, and middle class entitled consumers moaning about poor people breaking rules set up to cater for rich people's grouse hunting (https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/boris-johnson-rule-of-six-hunting-shooting-exemption_uk_5f5f4ad0c5b6b4850803110f?ggg) and non essential retail needs does not improve the mood.

      Delete
  17. 1. Since my previous comment was rejected, I feel my guess was correct: she is secular.

    2. Dear RDS, why you condemn learning of Tora on the expense of others, but promote learning of med on the expense of others?

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  18. We can be understanding of the many that struggled with loans and with getting ahead in the pursuit of supporting themselves. In a broader way, dealing with student debt is a larger issue than our communities can deal with by ourselves, solutions need to come from gvts. And we all can agree that it is complicated. At the same time, helping someone with a compelling story with a few dollars is a righteous thing to do.
    The level of animosity of some of the comments here are nothing short of 爪专讜转 注讬谉.

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  19. Hi Rabbi Slifkin FYI My daughters close friend is in her 3rd year @ AECOM her background is almost exactly like this story. She was from Williamsburgh and went to a Satmar style school. She is today a bit more modern yet a Shomer Shabbos and looking to marry and start a family and raise frum children...

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  20. How refreshing!. How inspiring. As a Chusid from Boropark I can say I fully support those brave souls who buck the trend and do their own thing. It does not matter to me what her current level of observance is, she is Jewish, Heimish from "our circles" and is doing something that his hard, had to jump over many obstacles and go against the grain, going to med school is definitely a noble cause and will benefit humanity. Period! I made a small donation, my only regret is that at the moment I could not make a larger donation.

    ReplyDelete
  21. 讜讘讙诪专讗 住谞讛讚专讬谉 (爪"讟:) 砖讗诐 讗讜诪专 诪讗讬 讗讛谞讬 诇谉 专讘谞谉, 诇讚讬讚讛讜 拽专讜 讜诇讚讬讚讛讜 转谞讜 讛讜讗 讗驻讬拽讜专住, 讜讛讬讬谞讜 讛讗讜诪专 砖讗讬谉 转讜注诇转 讘诇讜诪讚讬 转讜专讛, 砖诪转讻讜讜谞讬诐 专拽 诇讟讜讘转 注爪诪诐 谞拽专讗 讗驻讬拽讜专住,

    ReplyDelete

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