Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Is There a Disconnect between Torah Learning and Torah Living?

In light of everything going on, I would like to strongly recommend a wonderful and very important article by Rabbi Dr. Aharon Hersh Fried, "Is There a Disconnect between Torah Learning and Torah Living? And If So, How Can We Connect Them? A Focus on Middos,” from Hakirah: The Flatbush Journal of Law and Thought, Volume 6 (Summer 2008) pp. 11–56, freely downloadable at this link. It certainly does not account for all or even most of the Lakewood situation, but it assists with a certain aspect of it. Definitely worth reading, and if you've read it before, it's worth reading again!


9 comments:

  1. While "The Lakewood Disaster: The Insiders' Take" was not the first post you've retracted, if my memory serves, you usually comment in a subsequent post on what led you to reevaluate your earlier post. Will you share with us why you retracted the previous post?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Deleted does not necessarily equal retracted.

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    2. but with no other information anyone can,and will, draw their own conclusions
      kt
      joel rich

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  2. As you pointed out, it only deals with very specific aspects of the Lakewood situation.

    It completely fails to address one of the biggest elephants in the room. Unfortunately, the Torah and Chazal send a very mixed message as to how we should relate to non-Jews. Does anyone really believe that it's possible to read the Mishna Berurah's lamentations on Jewish doctors who are, nishtugedach, mechallel shabbos to travel and treat non-Jews without that impacting one's attitude towards the same non-Jews? The stories of Rav Yaakov Kaminetzky are nice, but they're easily counter-weighted by all the statements and even halachot which paint a different picture of our relationship with non-Jews.

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    Replies
    1. As far as I know, there is a clear division in Halacha. Actions which harm non-Jews is forbidden. Inaction which harms non-Jews is permitted. And then there's Darchei Shalom, which generally overrides any considerations of inaction, and forces one to act.

      You would think those who learn Talmud all day would be able to discern this and act accordingly. Unfortunately, as CHaZaL well knew, no amount of book learning teaches Derech Eretz.

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  3. Not to detract from the Ikkar, but he kinda lost me on the second page when he was too frum to mention Ben Gurion's unspeakable name ("A friend of mine was davening with a minyan at Lud airport.")

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    Replies
    1. To give him the benefit of the doubt, many Israelis, especially those over a certain age, call the airport Lud. Go into any hotel and ask for a sheirut to Lud and you'll wind up at the airport, not the town.

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  4. i think it is ultimately not a middos issue but a finances issue. Im ein kemach, something has to go . treif is cheap but issur deOraita. but dina demalchuta , that in many circles is not even felt to be halachic . learning 24/7 and building mosdos isn't done with Manna and Pennies from Heaven....

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  5. "Rapture and Reconstruction" should be required reading in many Jewish communities.

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