Wednesday, September 24, 2014

The Shofar Mistake

No time to write a post today, so I decided to re-post this hilarious post from two years ago. Wishing you all a year of health, happiness, and success!

My youngest child came home from gan with the following picture:


My eldest child, aged nine, pointed out a glaring mistake (I am so proud of her!) Can you spot it? I'm amazed at how many people I meet who have this misconception! (UPDATE: I am not referring to the fact that the head looks like that of a deer rather than a ram!)

24 comments:

  1. LOLLL... My daughter came home with a bull and said, "Look! An איל!"

    I was like... facepalm... until I realized that it was for bikkurim, and she had just confused the two lessons of the day.

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  2. I wasn't referring to a mistake about the species of animal! I just updated the post.

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  3. Aren't those horns on backwards? Wider part connects to the head...

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  4. The wrong end is attached to the head!

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  5. The shofars are growing upside down on the animal's head

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  6. Ram's horns are not antlers. They curve around from the top of the head toward the back of the head and then around under the ears.

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  7. Goodness. Have these people never seen horns on an animal before?

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  8. The horns are upside down.

    Then again, it's for kids who might not recognize the "shofar" in the horns if they were right side up.

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  9. The wrong end is coming out of the head?

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  10. I think the two mistakes go together... Attached upside down, the shofar's outline might be taken as as (rather odd) antler...

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  11. I totally misunderstood. Clearly your daughter thought the animal was a rainbow-colored tachash!

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  12. Looks fine to me. I always gore other creatures with the wide part of my horns and have the sharp side dig into the head. Its very practical.

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  13. Iyov had a daughter named קרן הפוך

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  14. Some years back I taught the Akeida -- trying to work out the rather puzzled look on a couple of faces (12-yr olds), it slowly became clear that several students thought that Avraham sacrificed a piece of hardware instead of his son ("How did that work?")

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  15. Your child in gan is not the one in error, I'm afraid--your child simply pasted the shofars on the outline of the shofar that is part of the picture. The artist is at fault.

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  16. OF COURSE the wide part of the horn is facing outward. How else is the ram supposed to honk!

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  17. @Yehudah P: My feelings exactly.

    Clearly, the "artist" here has never seen an actual ram. Such mistakes were excusable in the middle ages (e.g. in famous works of art where lions look like lambs because nobody had seen a real lion) but are inexcusable today when anybody can visit a nearby zoo and see real live animals.

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  18. Your child in gan is not the one in error, I'm afraid--your child simply pasted the shofars on the outline of the shofar that is part of the picture. The artist is at fault.

    look more closely, you will observer that the "artist" coloured within the lines.

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  19. Shofot only come from Rams?

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  20. Those are not shofars. They are speakers like you find on old phonographs.

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  21. Which Rav gave the haskamah for the text?

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  22. ram's horns are spiral-shaped, not straight...

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  23. oh, and the shofar is the wrong way round: the bit you blow into is far from the head, not near the head...

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  24. Rabbi, this is a recycled post. But that`s okay, because those drawings are recycled also

    A shanah tovah to all. Health, happiness and some parnassah, too.

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