Thursday, November 14, 2013

Was Eisav a Vampire?

This post was originally published two years ago, and is one of the most-read posts of all time! It stemmed from a post that I wrote about werewolves which stirred up a great deal of interest. This topic led me to come across an interesting discussion about Eisav being a vampire. The following evidence was given, and I have appended several further pieces of evidence that were given in the comments:
1. The Midrash (Bereishis Rabbah 63:10) describes Eisav as "ensnaring" or, "hunting" people "with his mouth." While the Midrash itself explains that in a metaphorical sense, perhaps it is also intended literally. Hunting people with one's mouth is what vampires do.

2. The Midrash Pirkei D'Rabbi Eliezer (Ch. 37) says that Eisav wanted to suck out Yaakov's blood:
אמר עשו איני הורג את יעקב בחצים ובקשת אלא בפי אני הורגו ומוצץ את דמו שנ' וירץ עשו לקראתו וישקהו אל תהי קורא וישקהו אלא וינשכהו

3. Why would Eisav trade his birthright for lentil soup? The "red, red stuff" was instead something more precious: blood!

4. The Midrash discusses how Yaakov "gave his life" for the birthright. But how is giving away lentil soup "giving one's life"? Rather, it means that he gave Eisav some of his blood.

5. When Eisav was reunited with Yaakov and "fell on his neck and kissed him", the word "kissed" has dots on it, which the Midrash explains to allude to the fact that Eisav tried to bite him. Who else would bite someone on the neck other than a vampire?

6. When Yaakov was struggling with Eisav's angel, the latter had to leave at daybreak. Why? Because vampires are harmed by daylight!

7. What did the angel mean when he says that Yaakov struggled "with God and with man" Which was it? Answer - it was with a vampire, which is immortal and thus has aspects of both God and man.

8. The Gemara (Sotah 13a) says that when Eisav tried to prevent Yaakov from being buried in Machpelah, Chushim Ben Dan killed him with a wooden stick and beheaded him. That is how you kill a vampire - with a wooden stake, and by beheading.

9. Vampires have hair on their palms, and Eisav had hair all over his body, including, most significantly, on his hands - HaYodayim y'dei Eisav.

10. Eisav was known as "the red one" and this may have been due to the color of his hair rather than his complexion. Red hair is traditionally a sign of vampirism.

11. Eisav's angel wrestled with Yaakov before he crossed the river. This was because Eisav's angel couldn't cross the river himself - vampires cannot cross running water.

12. According to the Gemara in Bava Kama, the category of damages of shen, "tooth," is learned from Eisav: "איך נחפשו עשו נבעו מצפוניו" (Ovadia 1). The Gemara understands this pasuk to refer to fangs.

13. According to Chazal, Eisav had attacked a young woman. This is typical behavior for vampires.

Finally, the reason given for why all this is not widely known, is that Jews are very sensitive about matters involving blood, due to blood libels.

It's an ingenious explanation, no? I'm not revealing where I saw this idea, because the interesting question to consider is this: How would your evaluation of this explanation differ depending on whether it was said by a thirteenth-century Rishon from Northern France, an eighteenth-century Acharon, a contemporary Gadol, or a regular Joe of today?

78 comments:

  1. רבינו אברהם מסטוקר says this, no?

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  2. Lol . . . My opinion would be the same regardless of who it was sourced to - great sense of humor, hope nobody takes them seriously.

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  3. If it was said by someone in medieval times, I'll give him a pass. If it was said by anyone today, that person is either incredibly ignorant, incredibly naive, or out of his mind.

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  4. I have another proof! Vampires (or at least Dracula) have hair on their palms, and Eisav had hair all over his body, including, most significantly, on his hands!!!! (HaYodayim y'dei Eisav.)

    I wasn't so sure before, but now that I have a stake in the theory (pun most definitely intended), I believe it!!!

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  5. The contrast between Akiva and Yehudah is curious.

    FYI, Ismalic political artists depict Jews as Vampires sucking out the blood from the world. Ironically, they not only confused Ishmael with Issac, but Yaakov with Esav!

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  6. Isn't it a wee bit early for Purim Torah, laddie?

    Besides, Eisav couldn't have been a vampire.
    1) Yaakov Avinu kept all the mitzvos, we are told. Why was he cooking blood pudding (with real blood) when he and his brother were forbidden to eat it?
    2) To get to Seir from Israel requires one to cross the Jordan River. Vampires cannot cross running water.
    3) At the blessing incident, Eisav marches into Yitzchak's tent without so much as a by your leave. Vampires cannot enter a dwelling without first being invited.
    4) The Eisav-Yaakov meeting at the beginning of Vayishlach took place during the day.

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  7. This is turning into a fantastic B-movie plot:
    "Vampires VS. Werewolves"!

    The Tanach indeed depicts a Binyamin-Amalek rivalry. Eisav was the grandfather of Amalek. And time and again it is Binyamin who is called to confront Amalek...

    1. Ehud ben Gera "Hayimini" called to defend Israel from Amalek (Shoftim 3:15)

    2. Shaul Hamelech, commanded to wipe out Amalek

    3. Mordechai Hayehudi "Ish Yemini" facing Haman

    Then there's the pasuk: "From Ephraim, their root with Amalek, after you is Binyamin, with your peoples." (Shoftim 5:14)

    This seems to mean that after Ephraim takes a first crack at Amalek, it's Binyamin who goes after them for the final kill.

    And here we are today, the seed of Amalek and Binyamin still among us, silently waiting in the shadows to once again engage in epic battle! Who will win in the end, the evil vampire or righteous werewolf? Stay tuned...

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  8. this is deff entertaining and the author id very creative but this creativity should be put to a better use , esav a vampire? come on get real.

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  9. I have another proof! Vampires (or at least Dracula) have hair on their palms, and Eisav had hair all over his body, including, most significantly, on his hands!!!! (HaYodayim y'dei Eisav.)

    Wow, that's good! Yes, hairy palms are indeed part of the vampire legend.

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  10. my responses would be...

    Rishon: interesting!
    Aḥaron: weird.
    Gadol: uh....
    Joe: ha, cute!

    But David Meir has the best response.

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  11. A friend of mine in Yeshivah had the same theory. He would be thrilled if it turned out to be some Rishon.

    Great post!

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  12. If it was said by anyone contemporary during the month of February/March (presuming the anyone in question had a sense of humor), I would jump straight to Purim Torah. If it was said by anyone before that, I would presume they were grossly mistaken, no matter the credentials. But then again, you never needed to convince me of anything.

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  13. Just one thing, one of the reasons that you pointed out was that Eisav bit Yakov on the neck, and said who else does that? Well, Eisav wanted to kill Yakov. If he bit his neck, then he could have ruptured some important parts of his body. Just because he wanted to bite him on the neck does not mean that he is a vampire, it could mean that he wanted to rupture the passageway for Yakov's oxygen and kill him.

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  14. You realize that I don't actually think that Eisav was a vampire, right?

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  15. Stuff like this is why Tanach would make a good anime...midrashim are especially helpful.

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  16. "You realize that I don't actually think that Eisav was a vampire, right?"
    R' Slifkin, do you often get comments that you are condescending?

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  17. Maybe you don't but Pharoah was clearly a Time Lord.
    Think about it: he appears first in Avraham's time, then Yosef's time, and then finally in Moshe's time, spanning centuries but there's enough evidence to suggest that people don't recognize him as the same person even though the Midrash tells us that he was. Clearly he had regenerated into a new appearance between episo... I mean, appearances.

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  18. "The following evidence was given:
    1. The Midrash (Bereishis Rabbah 63:10) describes Eisav as "ensnaring" or, "hunting" people "with his mouth." "

    it's almost explicit in the passuk, which says that he hunted with/in his mouth. but that would include canines, felines, reptiles etc.; medrash tells us the victim: man, so that would include man eaters.

    garnel said, "Yaakov Avinu kept all the mitzvos, we are told. Why was he cooking blood pudding (with real blood) when he and his brother were forbidden to eat it?"

    if cooked blood is m'derabanan it wasn't forbidden yet, unless you hold like kofer bear in the video that yaakov kept d'rabanans.

    but that's why Yaakov cooked it, to take off the d'oraisah.

    BTW,kofer bear was also a vampire, so he said his vurt to get the other bear's brain to bleed. yummmm...;)

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  19. Glad my comment of the werewolf post is gaining traction. Keep up the great work, and love your new book!

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  20. I suppose we might as well ask, Did Yaakov cook his lentil soup with or without garlic?

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  21. Please don't tell me there's a Torah remez to a Slayer.

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  22. For the benefit of the masses, let me reproduce here a discussion that took place about a week ago here on this blog.

    Lakewood Falling Down said...
    My son wants to know if Eisav who was born with teeth, and was Binyamin's Uncle was also possibly a werewolf? He did bite Yaakov's neck!
    December 22, 2011 2:46 AM

    Lord Voldemort said...
    My son wants to know if Eisav who was born with teeth, and was Binyamin's Uncle was also possibly a werewolf? He did bite Yaakov's neck!
    No, Eisav was a vampire (obviously).
    December 22, 2011 8:01 AM

    Natan Slifkin said...
    No, Eisav was a vampire (obviously).
    I've actually heard people say that.
    December 22, 2011 11:45 AM

    Snape said...
    >> No, Eisav was a vampire (obviously).
    > I've actually heard people say that.
    This is getting better and better!
    So the red, red stuff -- not exactly lentil soup, was it?
    December 22, 2011 5:33 PM

    Yannai Segal said...
    >> No, Eisav was a vampire (obviously).
    > I've actually heard people say that.
    This is getting better and better!
    So the red, red stuff -- not exactly lentil soup, was it?
    Heh, my 10-year old actually hypothisized this at the Shabbat table last week based on the evidence:
    1) The neck biting
    2) The red, red stuff
    3) The fact that his angel had to flee before sunrise
    4) Stereoypical vampires are also recognizable by thick luxurious hair (v-shaped widow's peak)
    December 22, 2011 8:40 PM

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  23. Hey guys i have a proof. Esav was born with red hair. Red hair is a sign of a vampire

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  24. I just checked, and you're right! Good one!

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  25. You realize that I don't actually think that Eisav was a vampire, right?

    So you think that Eisav was a literal flesh-and-blood human being indistinguishable from any homo sapien of today?

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  26. How would your evaluation of this explanation differ depending on whether it was said by a thirteenth-century Rishon from Northern France, an eighteenth-century Acharon, a contemporary Gadol, or a regular Joe of today?

    Regular Joe - very creative, yesher koach!
    Gadol - his handlers quoted something (from him and/or to him) out of context
    Acharon - literary fiction
    Rishon - must be a forgery

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  27. Hey guys, just stirred up another proof. The midrash relates to the unborn esav, saying that whenever rivka passed a place of avoda zara he was drawn to it.


    We know that vampires are unholy creatures.

    This could possibly mean that since he was a vampire he was drawn to unholy places i.e avoda zara.

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  28. I have developed a shiur and source sheet on this exact subject; I don't believe anyone has mentioned yet that (Breishit 32:26) "וַיַּרְא, כִּי לֹא יָכֹל לוֹ, וַיִּגַּע, בְּכַף-יְרֵכוֹ" . "Vayiga" is commonly translated as "injured" however the shoresh also can mean "to taste"; the groin ('yerecho') is the second most popular place for vamps to bite, as the blood flows most freely from the femoral artery. I'd love to send you my source sheet if you're interested!

    "You realize that I don't actually think that Eisav was a vampire, right?"
    Classic :)

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  29. Now, this is what one would call "Shteiging in Shtusim"...

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  30. It's a good question. 

    If it was a regular Joe, I would say that their books should be banned and they should be publicly vilified.

    If it was a contemporary Godol, I don't see how the question is relevant as I don't know a single Godol (other than perhaps GH) that know what a vampire is. 

    If it was a 18th century Achron it could be considerd as Daas Torah, depending on if the Achron had any ties to the Hassidic movement. 

    If it was a 13th century Rishon who was also a rationalist, then we could still explain it by saying it was perfectly fine to believe in vampires when they lived. 

    But if it had been written by a bronze age tribesman living in the middle east during the second century, then I would accept it unquestioningly as the words of God. 

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  31. Finding nothing on the connection between Eisav and garlic (except for a video of chef David Esau giving a tutorial about garlic), I resorted to this:

    Esau, according to a kabbalistic teaching, is a reincarnation of Cain, and "that is why [Cain] killed his brother Abel with his mouth, as is known."

    I guess it's known now.

    "He bit him profusely, not knowing where his soul would leave him." (Zohar I:54b) (Sorry, I could not find this phrase on an online English translation of Zohar.)

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  32. ok, ok...enough.

    Can you now, finally, confirm where you found this discussion?

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  33. וַיַּרְא, כִּי לֹא יָכֹל לוֹ

    Couldn't see himself in the mirror...?

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  34. With all that's going on in the world, I love posts like this to keep the stress off. One of the best parts about posts like these is it exposes who has a sense of humor and who doesn't. I hate people who take themselves to seriously!
    A request, as I am not s well versed as I should be. Is there anywhere in any scriptural source to show Hashem has a sense of humor?

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  35. We've had werewolves and vampires. Heaven forfend any of them sparkle.

    Plenty of Middle Eastern Jews historically believed in djinn. Many still do.

    If you can fit Azathoth and Cthulhu in there somewhere I will publicly squee and start wearing a gartle and Borsalino.

    But if you want a quintessentially Jewish story that includes an even more horrible monster and will break your heart you must read Uncle Chaim, Aunt Rivka and the Angel by one of my favorite Brooklyn Jews, Peter Beagle.

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  36. thirteenth-century Rishon from Northern France... lo zochisi lehovin devorov hakedoshim

    an eighteenth-century Acharon... a shevere zach to say
    a contemporary Gadol... that is a godol ?
    a regular Joe of today? ...get a life

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  37. I'm on Team JACOB!!!!! (even though binyamin was the werewolf, not Eisav :( )

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  38. Lakewood Falling Down, may I recommend the following?
    http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/economic/friedman/bibhumor.htm

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  39. Looking over this week's parsha, I realized that while it's certainly debatable whether Binyamin was a werewolf and Eisav was a vampire, it's pshat that both Yaakov and Yosef were The Mummy.

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  40. There is a Pirkei D'Rabbi Eliezer (Ch. 37) which is perhaps of interest:
    אמ' עשו איני הורג את יעקב בחצים ובקשת אלא בפי אני הורגו ומוצץ את דמו שנ' וירץ עשו לקראתו וישקהו אל תהי קורא וישקהו אלא וינשכהו

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  41. The above citation from Rafael should be moved up to the body of the post.

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  42. lol - great post!

    For the next one can you somehow connect techiyas hamaysim to a zombie apocalypse? Ive been thinking about that one since my Walking Dead obsession

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  43. Rabbi,

    I know there are important things going on in the world right now, but nu? My 10-year-old (inner and actual) is itching for more on this.

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  44. anyone else that we know of who was a vampire? how about a werewolf?

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  45. I blown away by the number of examples you were able to find...

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  46. Eisav may have been permited to drink human blood even if he followed the not yet written Torah... I remember reading somewhere that Human blood is only Assur because of Maris Ayin (similar to fish blood). And that even the subject of human flesh is up for debate where it has been declared usser by ashkenaz but not decided for sephard... so watch out for your sephardic friends... if it doesnt taste like chicken it might not be.

    Anyways, the whole topic of human blood and flesh would make a whole new interesting post I am sure,

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  47. Eisav may have been permited to drink human blood even if he followed the not yet written Torah... I remember reading somewhere that Human blood is only Assur because of Maris Ayin (similar to fish blood). And that even the subject of human flesh is up for debate where it has been declared usser by ashkenaz but not decided for sephard... so watch out for your sephardic friends... if it doesnt taste like chicken it might not be.

    Anyways, the whole topic of human blood and flesh would make a whole new interesting post I am sure,

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  48. I found something about Cain and Hebel!

    בשעה שהרג קין את הבל' לא היה יודע איך יוצאת נשמתו ממנו˙ נשך אותו
    נשמתיה מיניה˙ נשיך ליה בשיניה כחויא (=אמר ר, יצחק: בוא וראה'
    "אמר ר, יצחק: תא חזי' בשעתא דקטיל קין להבל לא הוה ידע היך נפיק

    בספרד באותה תקופה' בראשית נד ע"ב:
    במקרה שלנו נראה כי המקור לאיור זה הוא ממה שמצינו בזהר' שידוע היה
    מבוססות על מסורות יהודיות שהועברו לאמנים הנוצרים מאת ר, משה [6]˙
    בקשתו של אחד מאצילי ספרד' והתמונות בדרך כלל
    לקסטיליינית מאת החכם היהודי ר, משה ארגל שעשה את מלאכתו על פי
    מתחת לגרונו' והדם שותת מנשיכה זו˙ ...כתב יד זה כולל תרגום התנ"ך

    http://www.biu.ac.il/JH/Parasha/bereshit/bereshith2.html

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  49. Pleace tell me the mekor of this, wath you wrote im wondering about it for years im serius thanks david

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  50. kiefer sutherland in the lost boys.
    please im going serius tell me the mekor becouse i don´t belive you

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  51. Temujin will be busy for the next couple of days drawing up and sending technical specs to Chinese factories for wooden stakes with safety handles for the all-thumbs-bochurim who never wielded a hammer in teir lives, silver bullets (well, silver-plated is enough), garlic garlands and such. All available in a package including those geeky bug-checking goggles and the obsolete film strip light tables reborn as bug-checkers.

    One thanks Rabbi Slifkin for this excellent humorous piece. And look at the number of responses...hmm, chem trails, pyramid power, hollow earth, Anunaki, etc., would crank up the vistorship fer sure. A good reminder of how stringing together vague allusions and non-sequiturs and superimposing modern or foreign ideas onto them can lead one to all sorts of narrishkeit. There is a lesson in this.

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  52. Also, Eisav's angel was on the other side of the river; obviously, he couldn't cross running water.

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  53. A few more:
    1. According to the gemara in BK. The Av Nezekin of "Shen" is learned from Eisav.
    "איך נחפשו עשו נבעו מצפוניו"
    (Ovadia 1). The gemara undertands this pasuk to refer to fangs.

    2. According to Chazal, Eisav had raped (And then killed?) a young maiden. Typically attributed to Vampires.

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  54. the earliest reference to vampires i'm aware of is in the sefer hachassidim though I don't believe there is a mention of Eisav there.

    also, Eisav denied the resurrection of the dead. Propitious if he is of the 'undead'.

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  55. There are many opinions on how to kill a vampire. From _The Straight Dope_ column by Cecil Adams, ed. Ed Zotti, 16 July 1982:

    SPECIES - COUNTRY - APPROVED METHOD OF DISPOSAL

    Sampiro - Albania - Stake through heart

    Nachtzehrer - Bavaria - Place coin in mouth, decapitate with ax

    Ogoljen - Bohemia - Bury at crossroads

    Krvoijac - Bulgaria - Chain to grave with wild roses

    Kathakano - Crete - Boil head in vinegar

    Brukalaco - Greece - Cut off and burn head

    Vampir - Hungary - Stake through heart, nail through temples

    Dearg-dul - Ireland - Pile stones on grave

    Vryolakas - Macedonia - Pour boiling oil on, drive nail through navel

    Upier - Poland - Bury face downwards

    Gierach - Prussia - Put poppy seeds in grave

    Strigoiul - Rumania - Remove heart, cut in two; garlic in mouth, nail in head

    Vlkoslak - Serbia - Cut off toes, drive nail through neck

    Neuntoter - Saxony - Lemon in mouth

    Vampiro - Spain - No known remedy

    ----------------

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  56. 30 seconds of google yields this, from 1990.
    ----------------------------
    Like the leech, Esau was a vampire. Once when he came in from the field from hunting, he was hungry. Unwilling to get one of the servants to fix a meal for him, he demanded some of Jacob’s lentils. Notice Esau’s words: "Let me have a swallow of the red, this red stuff" — therefore his name was called Edom (Red) (Gen. 25:30). Esau, you see, thought that Jacob was cooking blood. We can readily assume that as a hunter, Esau had often drunk blood in the field, in defiance of God’s command (Gen. 9:4).

    Esau was a vampire man. He readily traded his birthright for what he thought was blood soup, but then wanted it back.
    --------------------------------

    The Pirkeo D'Drebbi Eliezer is the most important citation, almost (not quite) explicit. Makes perfect sense for the time and date of its composition.

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  57. Some great additions here! I will update the post.

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  58. Great stuff!

    Hunters in many ancient cultures drank blood, Esav was an ancient hunter, vampires are based on ancient hunting legends ... therefore Esav is a vampire.

    Anyway, if anyone is interested in reading about what Chazal meant by "hunting people", and the less sensational meaning of the verse in Ovadiah, may I recommend my blog on the Haftarot, "http://www.torahforum.org/haftara/?p=152 (in memory of my father, z"l)

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  59. Maybe it's the other way around. Maybe the vampire myth has its origins in the Midrash of PDR"E.

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  60. A friend sent me this article, and though I take it only in jest, it never hurts to look for a good gematria or two, so here's my offering:

    "Dracula" spelled דראקוללה exactly equals the gematria of Eisav (376), and both equal "כבערפד" - "as in a vampire".

    And if I may wax homiletical, the silent "ayin" of Eisav (the silent letter, but also "eye") hints to a vampire being invisible in a mirror, the "sin" to his fangs, and the "vav" to the stake needed to kill him.

    Finally, to answer Rav Natan's question: No, I wouldn't be totally shocked if some rishon had proposed that Eisav was a vampire; I'd only be shocked if the rishon wrote that Ya'akov would ward him off using a cross!

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  61. A friend sent me this article, and though I take it only in jest, it never hurts to look for a good gematria or two, so here's my offering:

    "Dracula" spelled דראקוללה exactly equals the gematria of Eisav (376), and both equal "כבערפד" - "as in a vampire".

    And if I may wax homiletical, the silent "ayin" of Eisav (the silent letter, but also "eye") hints to a vampire being invisible in a mirror, the "sin" to his fangs, and the "vav" to the stake needed to kill him.

    Finally, to answer Rav Natan's question: No, I wouldn't be totally shocked if some rishon had proposed that Eisav was a vampire; I'd only be shocked if the rishon wrote that Ya'akov would ward him off using a cross!

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  62. @Kira: Hunters in many ancient cultures drank blood, Esav was an ancient hunter, vampires are based on ancient hunting legends ... therefore Esav is a vampire.

    A splendid point! Ancient hunters with simple projectile weapons and weak bows would only wound the animal and would have to follow it for hours and sometimes days over many miles before it weakened enough to be dispatched from up close. The tired, hungry and thirsty hunters would typically feast on the parts that spoiled rapidly; the blood and the organs. However, it was the pastoralists...such as the Masai and, ehem, the Mongols, who obtained blood as food from living animals through venesection and often by drinking directly from the opening. Temujin speculates that the vampire legend also owes its origins to the addition of cannibalistic practices, which are more common in environmentally stressed, protein-depleted societies. With the Fertile Crescent being an over-populated, seething maelstrom of cultures with various and often clashing means of production, a fusion of myths and fears could have given the rise to the legends of blood-drinking human cannibals. Temujin doesn't know enough though to speculate whether the references cited by Rabbi Slifkin and others could relate to such, or only appear related through cultural lenses of later European and Christian versions.

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  63. Robert K, would the addition of the hey and the use of the double lamed in דראקוללה be the standard or the only way of transliterating this Romanian, Latin-based word?

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  64. "Vampire" is a great metaphor to the behavior of Esav and his offspring then and today. They don't literally "suck your blood" but they are metaphorically "bloodsuckers" in that sense.

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  65. I can't believe that this post seems to be taken seriously by otherwise rational people. Nonsense does not require elaboration or justification.

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  66. I believe it was also said, perhaps in the Midrash, about King David that from birth had hair all over his body and was a redhead.

    To answer your question, whether it was said by a thirteenth-century Rishon from Northern France, and an eighteenth-century Acharon, I would say their beliefs were as the rest of society of those days, primitive and ignorant.

    As for a contemporary Gadol, he would have to show how holy and righteous he is, i.e. look everybody I hold from the Rishonim and the Acharonim, therefore I am on a higher level then the rest.

    A Jew is obligated to learn Torah, which in my opinion does not mean to just gobble up everything every Rabbi had said, but rather to learn the Torah on your own initiative, do you own navigating. In light of this, for the regular Joe of today, I would advise him, stay away from the Gadolem.

    The Gemara explains that with all rational and logic reasoning one can conclude that a rat is kosher. This post shows another example of how one can miscalculate.
    Rationalism is needed for a rational outcome.
    o

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  67. I'm sure everyone knows that vampire bats are real animals http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vampire_bat

    Are they mentioned in the Torah? Also, isn't the concept of "human vampires" a more recent idea?

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  68. "I can't believe that this post seems to be taken seriously by otherwise rational people." -- Y Aharon, perhaps all these rationalist people are seeing the fun for what it's worth, and running with it.

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  69. I don't think it's so outlandish to say that if there were legends of blood drinking hunters during the time of Chazal, and Chazal (for whatever reason) wanted to portray Eisav as a vicious and terrifying figure, they would draw upon these legends to make their point midrashically. Quite fascinating actually.

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  70. Y Aharon" "I can't believe that this post seems to be taken seriously by otherwise rational people." -- Y Aharon"

    Unfortunately, myths are very serious whenever people believe in them...and eventually act on them... and the vampire legend is even more so, especially for Jews. Temujin didn't want to bring up this repulsive and saddening subject so close to the Sabbath, but one can only tiptoe around it for so long: the Blood Libels. Over almost the entire European subcontinent and for over half a millennium between the early thirteen hundreds and well into the eighteenth century individual Jews and entire Jewish communities stood to be accused, tortured, tried and executed or at robbed and expelled, if "fortunate" as misanthropic monsters who need Christian blood for ritual purposes and as medicine to alleviate "special" Jewish afflictions. Even the Papacy, which at times issued strong condemnations, was unable to stop this mania. By the time it was over, this mania left behind tens of thousands of victims and hundreds of written records and popular "documentaries" in the form of popular woodblock print illustrations of Jews and Jewish communities as a communities of vampires.

    Temujin recommends Joshua Trachtenberg's classic, The Devil and the Jew: The Medieval Conception of the Jew and its Relation to Modern. Antisemitism. Written in the midst of the Second World War, the book was the first systematic treatment of the gradual demonization of the Jews of Europe and possibly the first one to link medieval fear and hatred of the Jew to its modernized versions leading to the Holocaust. One would caution that today we are no better off than in the Middle Ages; create a climate of belief and fear over "vampires" or "zombies" in popular culture and society will soon "find" culprits and the mania and profit motive to "do something about it."

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  71. Well, it's time, I think, for R' Natan to reveal who is the author of the vampire thesis that he cited. I have already given my assessment regardless of the antiquity of some source material. I should add, however, that biting and drinking blood does not, ipso facto, make for a vampire. Killing your opponent and drinking his blood is a very ancient pagan ploy. Such behavior remains today among some Arabs.
    I note also that the vampire is depicted as Darth Maul of "The Phantom Menace" film in the Star Wars series. Maul, however, is not portrayed as a vampire in the film, and the film's title is appropriate for this subject.

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  72. Garnel Ironheart said...
    > Maybe you don't but Pharoah was clearly a Time Lord.

    I don’t know about Pharoah, but I realized recently that Noach definitely was. How else do you explain how he traveled in a wooden box that was bigger on the inside.

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  73. As long as we're getting silly....So if I'm bitten by a vampire and then become one, to what extent am I still obligated by the halacha applicable to humans? (Or should we maybe table the issue till Purim?)

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  74. As long as we're getting silly....So if I'm bitten by a vampire and then become one, to what extent am I still obligated by the halacha applicable to humans? (Or should we maybe table the issue till Purim?)

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  75. Two issues I have: One, vampires are supposed to be pale, not red. Two, you kill a vampire by driving a stake through its heart, not beheading.

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  76. Srully, it seems that David Kornreich didn't take the trouble to invent an original moniker while spending much time and effort to attack R' Natan on his blog. There is also an inyan of geneivas daas involved - unless he simply forgot where the term originated.

    According to the modern 'Shulchan Aruch', Wikipedia, vampires were considered to be 'ruddy' in ancient folklore. The depiction of pale vampires is, apparently, a more modern phenomenon. Similarly, the killing of a vampire could be effected by beheading as well as driving a stake through its heart - at least according to a 'yesh omrim'.

    My prior comment on the waste of time involved in darshening this vampire business - even lightheartedly, would have been unnecessary if R' Natan had gone from Esav as a vampire to Binyamin as a werewolf (yes, there is a Rishon who actually makes that written conjecture). Then the progression would be from the strange to the absurd (akin to 'reductio ad absurdum'). Instead, he reversed the sequence.

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  77. My great grandfather was the Rav of the Transylvanian town of Segeshvaru.

    Guess what! That is the birthplace of Count Vlad Dracul, the impaler!

    All Jewish Vampires are invited to my tishes, at the Beis Medrosh of Chassidei Segeshvaru In Kiryas Motzetzkin.

    Mohalim who perform MP are also warmly accepted to our special gathering and celebrations.

    And remember that drinking human blood out of a person is not an Issur of Dam

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  78. Hi Everyone,This was how me and my Boyfriend became VAMPIRES. I got a guy from the internet called Mr. Smith who was a VAMPIRE so i told him that me and my boyfriend would love to become VAMPIRES so he asked me of my Name ,Country, Age ,State , address and he told me what to do for me and my boyfriend to become a vampire, which i did, he send me his blood immediately and in the next 3 days i got the blood sample through the DHL which me and my boyfriend drank in the next 30 minutes our bodies was transformed, we where transformed into a VAMPIRE , if you are interested in becoming a VAMPIRE. FIRST: Vampires is not at all like in the movies or books, Sure. I understand. You are young; you have the whole world open to you. You can be anything that you choose if you apply yourself and try hard to work toward that goal. But being a vampire is not what it seems like. It’s a life full of good, and amazing things. We are as human as you are.. It’s not what you are that counts, but how you choose to be. Do you want a life full of interesting things? Do you want to have power and influence over others? To be charming and desirable? To have wealth, health, and longevity? contact the vampires creed today via email: vampiresbloodbank@gmail.com

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